[Gabriel Blackwell] free The Natural Dissolution of Fleeting Improvised Men ebook

FREE DOWNLOAD The Natural Dissolution of Fleeting Improvised Men

Though H P Lovecraft is famed mostly for the influential body of short fiction he left behind he was also one of the most prolific correspondents of his time the author of than 100000 letters Undiscovered and unpublished until now The Natural Dissolution of Fleeting Improvise. When you figure out what s really going on it will either blow your mind or drive you mad Full review coming at HTMLGiant at some future date This will probably be my last formal review of the year and am real glad it was such an incredibly complex and interesting book to reviewhttptieryaswordpresscom201307

REVIEW é VANSOUTLETMALL.CO.UK ☆ Gabriel Blackwell

The Natural Dissolution of Fleeting Improvised Men

The ghost of Lovecraft or all three The Natural Dissolution of Fleeting Improvised Men is a startling investigation of the evanescence of the self It's not so much that it will leave you changed as that it will leave you nameless and wandering Brian Evenson author of Immobili. This was a very enjoyable wrap up to the GB first year trilogy I think sort of completing the arc traced in Shadow Man and referring explicitly to the speaker in this and SM as also being the author of Critiue of Pure Reason We sort of see by the endnotes the emergence from the academic crysalis of the GB persona as a writer Or maybe editor critic or something like thatI loved reading Lovecraft as a kid though that was tempered with some irritation at his florid language which I thought was overwrought Blackwell here is a lot readable even when he writes as Lovecraft I don t know maybe Lovecraft s letters are readable than his fiction but this too was pretty fun and relatively easy to get through without losing the otherworldly spookiness And I was excited in a way that made me laugh out loud when around 110 pages into it we finally got to my favorite Lovecraftian word cyclopean So bravo for thatThe storyline had genuine chills the seuence pairing our ink smeared narrator and the mold from outer space was awesome and the Lovecraft plot teased the power of language to transport us in a way that felt necessary without being cursory if that makes sense I enjoyed this a good deal in other words as a thriller and as a thinky meta thingI don t know what function exactly was served by the opening notes though Or maybe I didn t need to full arc of the Providence adventure since I was going to see it again later in detail The new elements of that story were wonderful when we got them in footnotes to Lovecraft s letter but since the episode climaxed in a way we d already seen in the intro I felt a little let down The cover to this book is great one of the most appealingly designed covers I ve seen in a way

Gabriel Blackwell ☆ 1 REVIEW

D Men is the last letter that Lovecraft wrote finishing it just days before his death on March 15 1937 This edition features extensive notes from the editor Gabriel BlackwellIt's difficult to know if Blackwell is a sharp editor a stone faced ventrilouist someone possessed by. Thoroughly unsettling stuff metafictional horror that works on about a half dozen levels


10 thoughts on “The Natural Dissolution of Fleeting Improvised Men

  1. says:

    When you figure out what's really going on it will either blow your mind or drive you mad Full review coming at HTMLGiant at some future date This will probably be my last formal review of the year and am real g

  2. says:

    One of the great tropes of Lovecraftian horror is that of found manuscripts letters documents and old weird books that prove beyond the shadow of a doubt the existence of cosmic terrors past the periphery of human existence Further Lovecraftian horror concerns monstrous alien god beings degenerate demi human cults and stranger things the exposure of which threatens to send us careening into the far comforting realms of madness

  3. says:

    The Natural Dissolution of Fleeting Improvised Men is fiendishly clever endlessly byzantine and brilliantly tongue in cheek in cheek In this book and his eually clever Shadow Man A Biography of Lewis Miles Archer Blackwel

  4. says:

    Thoroughly unsettling stuff metafictional horror that works on about a half dozen levels

  5. says:

    We lose and find ourselves in every great piece of fiction Sometimes you want out; other times you wish you could remain lost in those words Gabriel Blackwell's latest fits into the latter category

  6. says:

    It certainly didn't hurt that Lovecraft is wrapped up in this one but that wasn't the only reason I ended up adoring this book A falling apart version of a uesting novel the narratives buried in meta narratives compel reading of the text in the same way that the texts in the text pull in the narrators of those various intertwined narratives It's undertow powerful and sinister undertow I mean a character purported to be the author presenti

  7. says:

    This was a very enjoyable wrap up to the GB first year trilogy I think sort of completing the arc traced in Shadow Man and referring explicitly to the speaker in this and SM as also being the author of Critiue of Pure Reason We sort of see by the endnotes the emergence from the academic crysalis of the GB persona

  8. says:

    So very awesome One of my favorite novels read this year and though it's early in the year I imagine I'll keep coming back to this statement Reads beautifully and it winds in on itself and reflects itself Does so many great things and is in the tradition of both House of Leaves and Pale Fire but also distinctly its own take on fake memoiracademic explorationInterview to come

  9. says:

    Difficult to know uite what to say Voice is the best HPL impersonation proper I've come across Unsettling unpleasant and disturbing uite possibly mad like Schreber Imagine if Lovecraft wrote 'House of Leaves' without leaving his head What is happening to me?

  10. says:

    the roaming of a dreaming brain without any of the snares set by the nerves so that I felt as though I had no body as though my vision had no connection to the eye