{ Free } The Gathering Author Anne Enright


10 thoughts on “The Gathering

  1. says:

    this book was very frustrating i feel like i should love it but it's like there is a barrier a chastity belt between us preventing our love and as much as i want it it isn't going to happen for us there is a uality to her writing that reminded me of What I Loved or Housekeeping books i am also told i am supposed to love but just can't feel

  2. says:

    Please excuse me as I make a noise of annoyance disgust boredom and all around dissatisfaction UGHARGHHHHUHHH Don't even know how to spell that or if it makes any sense Hey that makes a nice segue into my reviewLet me start with the one perk I can honestly give this book Anne Enright has a beautiful grasp of words but she doesn't know how to

  3. says:

    These words are imbued with a despair so raw that not even once during the time I was reading this did I feel an ounce of regret envisaging the time the novel drew to its inevitable conclusion In fact I was eager f

  4. says:

    This book actually angered me and I think this paragraph sums up whyI know as I write these that they reuire me to deal in facts It is time to call an end to romance and just say what happened in Ada's house the year that I was eight and Liam was barely nineThat passage occurs about halfway through the book The preceding pages are an endle

  5. says:

    My full review of this book is larger than Goodreads' word count limit Find the entire essay at the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography cclapcentercom I am the original author of this essay as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegallyAs a book critic I of course try to steer clear of any information I can about a book I'm about to review until I'm done with the book myself and have already made up my

  6. says:

    An intelligent insightful and thought provoking novel about an Irish family experiencing the loss of a brother and sonAnne Enright’s 2007 novel that garnered the Man Booker Prize for that year is an enjoyable but sometimes difficult journey in the life of Veronica who has recently lost her brother Told from the days immediately following his tragic death as well as remembrances from their life together Enri

  7. says:

    Because a mother's love is God's greatest joke This sentence would make perfect sense to me if we turned it aro

  8. says:

    I have no idea how to feel about this book let alone rate itFor the first half I was in love with it I was in love with t

  9. says:

    When I see that some people have given this book five stars I start to uestion my own sanity For me the book had wonderful potential when I took it off the shelf and the Booker Award sticker only reinforced my im

  10. says:

    This novel is definitely not for everyone—probably why it has such a low rating here But I thoroughly enjoyed it Enright examines grief guilt and family trauma so universally in this story though she uses the lens of one

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


review ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ☆ Anne Enright

The Gathering

Anne Enright is a dazzling writer of international stature and one of Ireland’s most singular voices Now she delivers The Gathering a moving evocative portrait of a large Irish family and a shot of fresh blood into the Irish literary tradition combining the lyricism of the old with the shock of the new The nine surviving children of the Hegarty clan ar. These words are imbued with a despair so raw that not even once during the time I was reading this did I feel an ounce of regret envisaging the time the novel drew to its inevitable conclusion In fact I was eager for it to be over for the narrator to stop pouring forth her endless stream of inchoate conjectures and unsavoury insinuations Prior to this I have slogged my way through Vollmann s 800 page behemoth The Royal Family which despite its uncompromising sincerity and profound sympathy for the dispossessed of the earth features depravities of the highest order and I continue to do battle with Leslie Marmon Silko s righteously fiery tirade in Almanac of the Dead which takes pleasure in referencing every known and unknown stomach churning theme under the sun simply to make the reader suirm in their seat But somehow Anne Enright s seemingly innocuous concoction of blood bonds and family drama contains unpleasantness than the two works combined I do not know the truth or I do not know how to tell the truth All I have are stories night thoughts the sudden convictions that uncertainty spawns All I have are ravings like Every statement or harmless speculation opening a window into the narrator s world provides a disconcerting view of an emotionally repressed traumatized individual One who is outwardly an ordinary woman grappling with the challenges of a moderately satisfactory marriage at the sunset of her youth A mother of two tiptoe ing around her own life like a trespasser But it s only her relationship with her recently deceased brother Liam which seems to give her life substance endow it with meaning and purpose rooting her to a particular point in time and memory from which she cannot detach herself despite best efforts In a way she seems like a listless disembodied spirit propelled only by the currents of happenstance mundane daily occurrences and passive aggressive conversations with her siblings and ambiguous husband always ever grazing the surface of the truth the truth of a summer spent in her grandmother s place long ago with her brother Liam until the time she finally shuns hesitation and divulges that closely guarded wholly repugnant secret A secret so complex and incomprehensible even to its keeper that it seems to have hijacked her life in retrospect and delineated the downward trajectory of decline and eventual self destruction that Liam was doomed to follow They are a bundle of nerves frayed at the ends They are wearing each other away both of them amazed by the thinness of skin that happens just there how close they can be blood to blood so that the ticking afterwards of one inside the other might be a joke or a pulse the beating in your veins of someone else s heart In a sense the entire novel reads like the narrator s rambling extended letter of apology to a brother she failed to rescue in time both in the distant and recent past It is piercing and earnest Besides Anne Enright never indulges in the folly of distilling the issue into easy dichotomies of moral and immoral but uses words clever cutting precise words to make sense of the incident which serves as the seam of the narrative But unfortunately enough this is a particularly breed of fiction which impairs my ability to feel empathy for any of its characters even though I m always acutely aware of its power There is just too much hurt too much toxic resentment lurking between the arrays of words that seem to percolate into a reader s blood like insidious poison Even passages sketching a commonplace scene of domestic bliss are pregnant with implications that my mind refused to parse fully out of some hazily defined fear The sex scenes made my skin crawl Sometimes I felt I was going to drown in my own revulsion for this book People she used to think do not change they are merely revealed And yet I cannot deny the truth of Enright s masterful unravelling of this yarn which allows the reader to partake in the shared experience of a free fall that seems to have been Veronica Hegarty s life for thirty nine years In the end I am unable to love but I can grudgingly admire

free download The Gathering

Stinctive intelligence twists the world a fraction and gives it back to us in a new and unforgettable light The Gathering is a daring witty and insightful family epic clarified through Anne Enright’s unblinking eye It is a novel about love and disappointment about how memories warp and secrets fester and how fate is written in the body not in the stars. When I see that some people have given this book five stars I start to uestion my own sanity For me the book had wonderful potential when I took it off the shelf and the Booker Award sticker only reinforced my impression that this would be a great read WRONG Wonderful words strung together does not a good story make The narrator is completely two dimensional as written and I was unable to connect with her or her perspective in any way Yes I understand the woman s beloved brother fell apart and committed suicide but still her ennui and depression rang false as did her lovehate feelings for her overly large Irish family I understand that the book is about grief but I never knew where that all encompassing grief came from because it was never developed in the novel As a sister I assume she was close to her brother and I m told that by the author but I really only have the descriptions of her grief to go by because I didn t get any sense of their close relationship from reading the story I was also turned off by the freuent and BASE descriptions of the bodily variety No one over the age of twelve likes a story be it comedy or tragedy entirely made up of dk jokes I found it juvenile and off putting The sad thing is once the final secret of the origin of her brother s and her troubles was revealed I just didn t care any The one thing I appreciated about the book is that it put to bed my worry that I wouldn t find a book that I DIDN T like and maybe my tastes were not as discerning as a true book lover s might be I thank the author for that revelation at least

review ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ☆ Anne Enright

E gathering in Dublin for the wake of their wayward brother Liam drowned in the sea His sister Veronica collects the body and keeps the dead man company guarding the secret she shares with him something that happened in their grandmother’s house in the winter of 1968 As Enright traces the line of betrayal and redemption through three generations her di. This book actually angered me and I think this paragraph sums up whyI know as I write these that they reuire me to deal in facts It is time to call an end to romance and just say what happened in Ada s house the year that I was eight and Liam was barely nineThat passage occurs about halfway through the book The preceding pages are an endless series of shapeless ponderings on what may or may not have happened The narrator leaps from one era to the next with the basic point being Something terrible happened in my grandmother s house when I was a child but I can t tell you about that yet Here s how I think my grandmother may have met my grandfather but I wasn t there so I don t know Also I can t be sure of the things that happened even when I was there Isn t memory funny Let me give an alternative scenario that may or may not have happened But who knows that could be wrong too Memory is so funnyThe book sort of saves itself in the second half when it starts to get to the point but by then I just didn t care any The author is obviously incredibly skilled She can get by on the beauty of her writing alone but this kind of book only frustrates me because of its wasted potential It doesn t matter how beautifully you write something if you don t make me care about what you are writing I realized lately that I hadn t read a new author in uite a while and this represented a challenge to myself to read something I normally wouldn t This book taught me to trust my instincts

  • Paperback
  • 261
  • The Gathering
  • Anne Enright
  • English
  • 17 October 2017
  • 9780099523826

About the Author: Anne Enright

Anne Enright was born in Dublin where she now lives and works She has published three volumes of stories one book of nonfiction and five novels In 2015 she was named the inaugural Laureate for Irish Fiction Her novel The Gathering won the Man Booker Prize and The Forgotten Waltz won the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction