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Война и мир

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So I know you ve all been on edge these past two months and since I should be studying for the social work licensing exam tonight it seems like the perfect time to put an end to your suspenseAfter all my agonizing and the thoughtful suggestions below about whether I should mutilate my gorgeous hardcover Pevear and Volokhonsky translation in the interest of less hazardous subway toting Readers I carried him All 1272 pages Every day across five boroughs and three states for nearly two monthsSo the burning uestion on your mind is Should I risk misalignment and a redislocated shoulder in the interest of preserving a pristine edition that s inevitably going to get all banged up anyway as I lug it across battlefields and through trenches for what seems an eternity Which is important the book s spine or my ownBookster I am here to put an end to all this wondering Here is what you must do simply take a keen exacto knife you might ask a helpful Cossack to sharpen it for you and slice out the final Epilogue portion of this burdensome tome You will do no damage to the book the epilogue s like an appendix and hey what the hell cut that out too as this part is not necessary and in fact though it s theoretically only about 7% of the book this portion is actually responsible for at least 63% of its weight So slice that bitch out and throw it away Your vertebrae will thank you laterAnother advantage to getting rid of the Epilogue is that it will save you from having to read what is conceivably the most deadly dull and deflating ending to a vast and magnificently readable book ever written As a particularly exacting size ueen I demand that the glory of a huge novel s ending be proportional to its length I feel this is only fair I was loyal and patient and devoted many hours to reading the author s story and at the end I should be rewarded for my fortitude with a glorious finale That s always been my philosophy anyway Apparently though it s not Tolstoy sWhat is Tolstoy s philosophy you ask In particular what s his philosophy of history Well let me tell you Or better let him tell you Cause he will Over and over And then again And then in case you were interested and wanted to know let him REALLY tell you and keep telling you and tell you some and some no let him get into it finally now in great detailYeah Tolstoy s that perfect house guest who crashed on your couch for nearly two months and you re just thrilled as hell the whole time to have him visiting because he s just such a smart and great and interesting and heartfelt guy uel raconteur Oh sure sometimes he gets a bit dull and wonky with his policy ramblings but that stuff s basically okay And then yeah he s got these ide s fixes about history that are fine you guess but it s a bit weird how he s always repeating them and focusing on the same points over and over and he will corner your roommate s friend or a classmate you run into at the supermarket or an old lady waiting for the bus to explain yet again why he thinks Napoleon really isn t that great at ALL yeah that s odd but basically Leo is just super and you re thrilled to have him even for such an extended visit because he really is so brilliant and diverting and nearly truly worth his weight in gold You are sad to know he s going to leave but then his plane is delayed and you re happy you ll have him there just one night but somehow that s the night that he suddenly decides to come back to your house completely high on cocaine Leo then proceeds to stay up for hours drinking all your expensive scotch and talking your EAR off about his goddamn PHILOSOPHY of HISTORY that you really just could not care LESS about and he WILL not leave and let you go to bed he keeps TALKING and it s BORING and apparently he thinks your catatonic stare signals rapt interest because he just keeps on going explaining on and on He WILL NOT SHUT UP It is almost just like being physically tortured by this guy who you d thought was the best houseguest in the whole wide world And so when Leo finally leaves again the next morning ragged and bleary and too dazed still to be properly sheepish you re not sorry to see him go in fact you re very glad And does one annoying night cancel out two months of the great times you had together Of course it doesn t and you remember him fondly and tell anyone who asks how nice it was when he stayed But the night does carry a special weight because it was the last and when you remember dear Leo your wonderful houseguest your affection will not be totally untainted by the memory of his dull egotistical coked out rantings the night before he left for realBy which I mean to say the rest of this book was totally great As my Great Aunt Dot who s read this twice commented It s really not a difficult read at all there s a chapter about War and then a chapter about Peace so it never gets boring War and Peace is hugely entertaining and largely readable Plus it s enormously educational as you will be forced to learn than you ever wanted to know about the great Napoleon According to Tolstoy he wasn t that great No I mean really he wasn t that great War and Peace is a terrific date book because it s got lots of bloody action and also tons of romance plus you can make out during the dull parts where Tolstoy s talking for like twelve pages about various generals and strategies and his nineteenth centuried out opinions about historyIf there s a standard I value highly than my long book great ending demand it s the one that I call Make Me Cry I don t really think a book s that great unless it makes me cry No this doesn t work in the other direction just because a book makes me cry doesn t mean it s great I ve cried at really silly movies before and I used to cry regularly whenever I read the newspaper which is one reason I stopped War and Peace made me cry like a colicky baby that s been speared with a bayonet THREE TIMES I don t mean I misted up or got a little chokey I mean I sobbed wept and groaned thoroughly broke down and lost my shit on a very cathartic and soul rending level Hooray I can t guarantee that War and Peace will also make you cry but I bet if you re prone to that sort of thing you ve got a good shotGOD this book is good See you should really skip the Epilogue because besides being crushingly dull it s also very depressing in the wrong way and in addition to making you vow never to marry could make you forget how GREAT and AMAZING the rest of this is What a GREAT and AMAZING book Holy shit I m flipping through now and it s all coming back to me This was totally The Wire of 1868 If you like serious character development and plotting that unfolds over a long period of time you should seriously read this book I really didn t know much about this book before I read it but I think I remember someone Jane Smiley writing that War and Peace is about everything I wouldn t go along with that I m not sure if she would either but it is about most of the things that really matter If you are someone who thinks at all about life or death you might like this book Here is a passage from a character who s a POW marching barefoot through Russia in October In captivity in the shed he had learned not with his mind but with his whole being his life that man is created for happiness that happiness is within him in the satisfying of human needs and that all unhappiness comes not from lack but from superfluity but now in these last three weeks of the march he had learned a new and comforting truth he had learned that there is nothing frightening in the world He had learned that as there is no situation in the world in which a man can be happy and perfectly free so there is no situation in which he can be perfectly unhappy and unfree He had learned that there is a limit to suffering and a limit to freedom and that those limits are very close that the man who suffers because one leaf is askew in his bed of roses suffers as much as he now suffered falling asleep on the bare damp ground one side getting cold as the other warmed up that when he used to put on his tight ballroom shoes he suffered just as much as now when he walked uite barefoot his shoes had long since worn out and his feet were covered with sores p 1060I just think that s great Maybe it s not out of context Anyway one of the best things about reading this is how much of it is so strange Russia 1812 OMFG all so different and how much is the same The nuance specificity and instant recognizability of the characters in here is pretty amazing I know this sounds dumb but you really feel like you know these people and in a way it s the minor characters Sonya Anatole Dolokhov my favorite who are so perfectly drawn and make you go Man I know these people WoahI did appreciate having to think about war while reading this because that s something I ve never really done before At the beginning I d hoped that this would help me understand about why wars happen but it didn t That might have been what Tolstoy was trying to explain in his Epilogue but I have to confess that at that point I wasn t really listeningAnyway I liked this book It is long though Catching Fire know you ve all been on edge these past two months and since I should be studying for the social work licensing exam tonight it seems like the perfect time to put an end to your suspenseAfter all my agonizing and the thoughtful suggestions below about whether I should mutilate my gorgeous hardcover Pevear and Volokhonsky translation in the interest of less hazardous subway toting Readers I carried him All 1272 pages Every day across five boroughs and three states for nearly two monthsSo the burning uestion on your mind is Should I risk misalignment and a redislocated shoulder in the interest of preserving a pristine edition that s inevitably going to get all banged up anyway as I lug it across battlefields and through trenches for what seems an eternity Which is important the book s spine or my ownBookster I am here to put an end to all this wondering Here is what you must do simply take a The Wiley Handbook of Obsessive Compulsive Disorders, 2 Volume Set (Wiley Clinical Psychology Handbooks) keen exacto The Apple Bandit (Nancy Drew: Notebooks, knife you might ask a helpful Cossack to sharpen it for you and slice out the final Epilogue portion of this burdensome tome You will do no damage to the book the epilogue s like an appendix and hey what the hell cut that out too as this part is not necessary and in fact though it s theoretically only about 7% of the book this portion is actually responsible for at least 63% of its weight So slice that bitch out and throw it away Your vertebrae will thank you laterAnother advantage to getting rid of the Epilogue is that it will save you from having to read what is conceivably the most deadly dull and deflating ending to a vast and magnificently readable book ever written As a particularly exacting size ueen I demand that the glory of a huge novel s ending be proportional to its length I feel this is only fair I was loyal and patient and devoted many hours to reading the author s story and at the end I should be rewarded for my fortitude with a glorious finale That s always been my philosophy anyway Apparently though it s not Tolstoy sWhat is Tolstoy s philosophy you ask In particular what s his philosophy of history Well let me tell you Or better let him tell you Cause he will Over and over And then again And then in case you were interested and wanted to Incubus know let him REALLY tell you and The Sharpe Companion The Early Years keep telling you and tell you some and some no let him get into it finally now in great detailYeah Tolstoy s that perfect house guest who crashed on your couch for nearly two months and you re just thrilled as hell the whole time to have him visiting because he s just such a smart and great and interesting and heartfelt guy uel raconteur Oh sure sometimes he gets a bit dull and wonky with his policy ramblings but that stuff s basically okay And then yeah he s got these ide s fixes about history that are fine you guess but it s a bit weird how he s always repeating them and focusing on the same points over and over and he will corner your roommate s friend or a classmate you run into at the supermarket or an old lady waiting for the bus to explain yet again why he thinks Napoleon really isn t that great at ALL yeah that s odd but basically Leo is just super and you re thrilled to have him even for such an extended visit because he really is so brilliant and diverting and nearly truly worth his weight in gold You are sad to Tantra y salchicha. La vía sabrosa al sexo sagrado know he s going to leave but then his plane is delayed and you re happy you ll have him there just one night but somehow that s the night that he suddenly decides to come back to your house completely high on cocaine Leo then proceeds to stay up for hours drinking all your expensive scotch and talking your EAR off about his goddamn PHILOSOPHY of HISTORY that you really just could not care LESS about and he WILL not leave and let you go to bed he Textbook of Clinical Hemodynamics keeps TALKING and it s BORING and apparently he thinks your catatonic stare signals rapt interest because he just Down and Out in Paris and London know about the great Napoleon According to Tolstoy he wasn t that great No I mean really he wasn t that great War and Peace is a terrific date book because it s got lots of bloody action and also tons of romance plus you can make out during the dull parts where Tolstoy s talking for like twelve pages about various generals and strategies and his nineteenth centuried out opinions about historyIf there s a standard I value highly than my long book great ending demand it s the one that I call Make Me Cry I don t really think a book s that great unless it makes me cry No this doesn t work in the other direction just because a book makes me cry doesn t mean it s great I ve cried at really silly movies before and I used to cry regularly whenever I read the newspaper which is one reason I stopped War and Peace made me cry like a colicky baby that s been speared with a bayonet THREE TIMES I don t mean I misted up or got a little chokey I mean I sobbed wept and groaned thoroughly broke down and lost my shit on a very cathartic and soul rending level Hooray I can t guarantee that War and Peace will also make you cry but I bet if you re prone to that sort of thing you ve got a good shotGOD this book is good See you should really skip the Epilogue because besides being crushingly dull it s also very depressing in the wrong way and in addition to making you vow never to marry could make you forget how GREAT and AMAZING the rest of this is What a GREAT and AMAZING book Holy shit I m flipping through now and it s all coming back to me This was totally The Wire of 1868 If you like serious character development and plotting that unfolds over a long period of time you should seriously read this book I really didn t PHP Pocket Reference know these people and in a way it s the minor characters Sonya Anatole Dolokhov my favorite who are so perfectly drawn and make you go Man I

READ Война и мир

Uch historische oder militärtheoretische Überlegungen anstellt Viele Szenen hauptsächlich die Diskussionen und Gespräche innerhalb der Adels und Regierungskreise in St Petersburg sind auf Französisch geschrieben der damals im russischen Adel vorherrschenden Sprache Tolstoi zeichnete ein detailgetreues Abbild des russischen Adels an den sich der Roman auch richtete wobei er einige Figuren des Romans nach real existierenden Personen zeichnete beispielsweise Fürst Kutusow oder die Adelsfamilie Wolkonski die er im Roman Bolkonski nennt uelle Wikiped. 857 War and Peace Leo TolstoyWar and Peace is a novel by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy which is regarded as a central work of world literature and one of Tolstoy s finest literary achievementsTolstoy said War and Peace is not a novel even less is it a poem and still less a historical chronicle Large sections especially the later chapters are philosophical discussion rather than narrative Tolstoy also said that the best Russian literature does not conform to standards and hence hesitated to call War and Peace a novel Instead he regarded Anna Karenina as his first true novel 1978 1334 19 675 1356 01061399

FREE READ È VANSOUTLETMALL.CO.UK ñ Leo Tolstoy

Unter einem Brennglas die Zeit von 1805 bis 1812 aus russischer Sicht in einzigartiger Geschlossenheit darstellt Es wird fast ausschließlich aus der Perspektive einzelner russischer Adliger erzählt die sich wechselseitig beeinflussen Es werden Schlachten beispielsweise die Schlacht bei Austerlitz oder die Schlacht von Borodino beschrieben wichtige historische Begebenheiten wie der Brand Moskaus im Jahr 1812 aber auch Teestunden Bälle Jagden Konferenzen und Volksaufläufe Dabei nimmt der Verfasser weitgehend eine allgemeine Position ein aus der er a. This is one of those books that can be life changing I read this as a teenager and I remember exactly where I was sitting on my bed in my grandmother s house in southern Germany when I finished it I must have spent an hour just staring out the window in awe of the lives I d just led the experiences I d just hadI m now re reading this enjoying it immensely and no doubt appreciating it much than I did the first time Tolstoy has the most amazing ability to make us feel when he zooms out and examines historical events that the individual is nothing and then when he zooms in and paints intimate portraits of his characters that the individual is everything BreathtakingBy the way I m reading the Anthony Briggs translation Penguin Classics and it s marvelous I m uite picky when it comes to translations and this is one of the best I ve readIt s in the sweeping battle scenes that Tolstoy shows how insignificant the individual really is how even generals and emperors are at the mercy of random and unpredictable events Then when Tolstoy switches to the intimate drawing room scenes the entire perspective shifts and nothing matters than the individual consciousness that he depicts The juxtaposition of these two feelings is just well geniusI d forgotten how mystical Tolstoy gets with respect to Pierre s conversion or enlightenment or getting religion It s fascinating how Pierre becomes animated by these great ideas and that s a sign of his maturity whereas Prince Andrey matures in an almost opposite way by eschewing his former great ideas regarding military heroism and focusing instead at this point in the narrative on his baby sonThe contrapuntal movement of Pierre and Andrey s development is only highlighted when they re together debating whether one ought to try to improve people s lives Pierre or just focus on one s own happiness and leave the world alone Andrey It s actually a profound debate which then ends when Andrey beholds the vast sky again and something stirs inside him something long dormant and we as readers can t help anticipating that Andrey will be backOne of the great glories of reading War and Peace is to encounter in a novel characters struggling with serious philosophical issues not as airy abstractions but rather in terms of how they ought to live Pierre and Prince Andrey are the prime examples of this I kept thinking as I read the sections in which they struggle earnestly with such uestions that contemporary American fiction has precious little of this I wonder if it s because we ve all drunk the kool aid that says show don t tell making contemporary novelists shy away from such material But this little mantra while seemingly objective renders entire realms of fiction off limits Tolstoy is constantly telling us what Pierre and Andrey are thinking and the novel is so much better for itTolstoy s peace is of course anything but it s full of anticipation and intrigue and philosophical yearning from the bursting bewildering sallies of youth Natasha to the resigned feeling that life isn t what you dreamed when you were young and perhaps you aren t either Pierre The deftness and sheer range of human drama is staggeringAnd the war when it returns is no abstract matter Everywhere there are people caught up in this great event bewildered by it Here s Rostov on seeing the French officer he s brought down This pale mud stained face of a fair haired young man with a dimple on his chin and bright blue eyes had no business with battlefields it was not the face of an enemy it was a domestic indoor face Rostov can t help seeing him as a human being and in that moment his enthusiasm suddenly drained awayIt s interesting how when Rostov chases the French officer on horseback he thinks about the wolf hunt he was recently on When I read the scene of the hunt where the hunters capture the old She Wolf and her cubs I couldn t help feeling sorry for those animals for that animal family hunted for pure sport I wondered how that scene would come back into the narrative because of the obvious symbolic weight of it and here it is in the scene of war The characters hadn t empathized with the She Wolf in the same way that Rostov does with the French officer but I wonder if we re meant to anyway or at least be made somewhat uncomfortable as I was by such sport killing perhaps seeing it as a prelude to another kind of sport killing altogether namely warTolstoy can t help wearing his patriotism on his sleeve a bit as he describes Napoleon s advance and the rival Moscow social circles one of which has eschewed anything French while the other clings to its Francophile ways Of course the French speaking social circle is that of Helene who s cold and manipulative and whose brother schemed to snatch away Natasha in such well French fashion But this is no bald tale of Russian virtue and French perfidy Tolstoy is finely attuned to the chaos of war and to the humans that engage in it so much alike than not as everyone tries simply to survive and perhaps claim a little glory in the endI love how Tolstoy peppers his narrative with keen insights into human nature Here he is when describing the attitude of Muscovites on the approach of Napoleon At the first approach of danger two voices always speak out with eual force in a man s heart one tells him very sensibly to consider the exact extent of the danger and any means of avoiding it the other says even sensibly that it s too wearisome and agonizing to contemplate the danger since it is not in a man s power to anticipate future events and avoid the general run of things so you might as well turn away from the nastiness until it hits you and dwell on things that are pleasantTolstoy describes the cavalcade of human affairs as well as anyone and the evacuation of Moscow is a great example of it so many little stories described with the deftest brushstrokes The irony and humor also shine through when he describes Berg s ridiculous recitation of war stories or Count Rostov s childlike diffidence when it comes to the issue of whether they should empty their wagons of belongings in order to make room for wounded soldiersHurtling toward the end now and Tolstoy is hammering his theme that the individual is a slave to fate and mysterious forces This adds much irony to his tale and some biting commentary as well as when he says These man carried away by their passions were nothing than the blind executors of the saddest law of necessity but they saw themselves as heroes and mistook their doings for achievements of the highest virtue and honourIn the final pages the scenes return to domestic life full of family as the war generation ages and their children are born So many mixed emotions in the characters and in me the reader as our story ebbs to a close as this towering and monumental work of art draws ever nearer to silence Memento mori the characters are described as feeling in the face of an old countess and the same can be said of this entire work which is a testament to the fragility and beauty and fleetingness of life itselfAnd then finally we see Pierre and Natasha together but the last lines of the dramatic narrative belong to young Nikolay Prince Andrey s son who thinks Father Father Yes I m going to do something even he would have been pleased withTolstoy then delves directly into a philosophical treatise on free will capping his narrative with the final summation that it is no less essential to get away from a false sensation of freedom and accept a dependence that we cannot feelWith that the book closes and I feel again what a monumental work I ve just encountered I ll spend many days and weeks pondering these pages recalling little scenes and thinking about Tolstoy s grand arguments The scope is breathtaking and profound yet on every page you feel the frantic beating of the human heart Despite all its spiritual claims it s a deeply humanistic work Cheating for the Chicken Man kept thinking as I read the sections in which they struggle earnestly with such uestions that contemporary American fiction has precious little of this I wonder if it s because we ve all drunk the The Last Runaway kool aid that says show don t tell making contemporary novelists shy away from such material But this little mantra while seemingly objective renders entire realms of fiction off limits Tolstoy is constantly telling us what Pierre and Andrey are thinking and the novel is so much better for itTolstoy s peace is of course anything but it s full of anticipation and intrigue and philosophical yearning from the bursting bewildering sallies of youth Natasha to the resigned feeling that life isn t what you dreamed when you were young and perhaps you aren t either Pierre The deftness and sheer range of human drama is staggeringAnd the war when it returns is no abstract matter Everywhere there are people caught up in this great event bewildered by it Here s Rostov on seeing the French officer he s brought down This pale mud stained face of a fair haired young man with a dimple on his chin and bright blue eyes had no business with battlefields it was not the face of an enemy it was a domestic indoor face Rostov can t help seeing him as a human being and in that moment his enthusiasm suddenly drained awayIt s interesting how when Rostov chases the French officer on horseback he thinks about the wolf hunt he was recently on When I read the scene of the hunt where the hunters capture the old She Wolf and her cubs I couldn t help feeling sorry for those animals for that animal family hunted for pure sport I wondered how that scene would come back into the narrative because of the obvious symbolic weight of it and here it is in the scene of war The characters hadn t empathized with the She Wolf in the same way that Rostov does with the French officer but I wonder if we re meant to anyway or at least be made somewhat uncomfortable as I was by such sport On Tidy Endings killing perhaps seeing it as a prelude to another Flat World Navigation kind of sport A House of My Own Stories from My Life killing altogether namely warTolstoy can t help wearing his patriotism on his sleeve a bit as he describes Napoleon s advance and the rival Moscow social circles one of which has eschewed anything French while the other clings to its Francophile ways Of course the French speaking social circle is that of Helene who s cold and manipulative and whose brother schemed to snatch away Natasha in such well French fashion But this is no bald tale of Russian virtue and French perfidy Tolstoy is finely attuned to the chaos of war and to the humans that engage in it so much alike than not as everyone tries simply to survive and perhaps claim a little glory in the endI love how Tolstoy peppers his narrative with Under Her Command (The Bosss Pet, keen insights into human nature Here he is when describing the attitude of Muscovites on the approach of Napoleon At the first approach of danger two voices always speak out with eual force in a man s heart one tells him very sensibly to consider the exact extent of the danger and any means of avoiding it the other says even sensibly that it s too wearisome and agonizing to contemplate the danger since it is not in a man s power to anticipate future events and avoid the general run of things so you might as well turn away from the nastiness until it hits you and dwell on things that are pleasantTolstoy describes the cavalcade of human affairs as well as anyone and the evacuation of Moscow is a great example of it so many little stories described with the deftest brushstrokes The irony and humor also shine through when he describes Berg s ridiculous recitation of war stories or Count Rostov s childlike diffidence when it comes to the issue of whether they should empty their wagons of belongings in order to make room for wounded soldiersHurtling toward the end now and Tolstoy is hammering his theme that the individual is a slave to fate and mysterious forces This adds much irony to his tale and some biting commentary as well as when he says These man carried away by their passions were nothing than the blind executors of the saddest law of necessity but they saw themselves as heroes and mistook their doings for achievements of the highest virtue and honourIn the final pages the scenes return to domestic life full of family as the war generation ages and their children are born So many mixed emotions in the characters and in me the reader as our story ebbs to a close as this towering and monumental work of art draws ever nearer to silence Memento mori the characters are described as feeling in the face of an old countess and the same can be said of this entire work which is a testament to the fragility and beauty and fleetingness of life itselfAnd then finally we see Pierre and Natasha together but the last lines of the dramatic narrative belong to young Nikolay Prince Andrey s son who thinks Father Father Yes I m going to do something even he would have been pleased withTolstoy then delves directly into a philosophical treatise on free will capping his narrative with the final summation that it is no less essential to get away from a false sensation of freedom and accept a dependence that we cannot feelWith that the book closes and I feel again what a monumental work I ve just encountered I ll spend many days and weeks pondering these pages recalling little scenes and thinking about Tolstoy s grand arguments The scope is breathtaking and profound yet on every page you feel the frantic beating of the human heart Despite all its spiritual claims it s a deeply humanistic work


About the Author: Leo Tolstoy

Лев Николаевич Толстой; commonly Leo Tolstoy in Anglophone countries was a Russian writer who primarily wrote novels and short stories Later in life he also wrote plays and essays His two most famous works the novels War and Peace and Anna Karenina are acknowledged as two of the greatest novels of all time and a pinnacle of realist fiction Many consider Tolstoy to have been one of the world's greatest novelists Tolstoy is eually known for his complicated and paradoxical persona and for his extreme moralistic and ascetic views which he adopted after a moral crisis and spiritual awakening in the 1870s after which he also became noted as a moral thinker and social reformerHis literal interpretation of the ethical teachings of Jesus centering on the Sermon on the Mount caused him in later life to become a fervent Christian anarchist and anarcho pacifist His ideas on nonviolent resistance expressed in such works as The Kingdom of God Is Within You were to have a profound impact on such pivotal twentieth century figures as Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr



10 thoughts on “Война и мир

  1. says:

    So I know you've all been on edge these past two months and since I should be studying for the social work licensing exam tonight it seems like the perfect time to put an end to your suspenseAfter all my agonizi

  2. says:

    When I was growing up the conventional wisdom was that War and Peace was the sine ua non of difficult books the scope the length OMG the lengt

  3. says:

    Before I turned the last page of this massive volume which had been neglected in my bookshelves for than six years War an

  4. says:

    Whatever else I am I am the type of person who reads classic novels out of a sense of obligation Also I must admit out of a sense of vanity My ego after all is as fragile as a goldfish and reuires the constant attention of a newborn baby Every once in awhile it needs a little boost and the intellectual challenge of Dostoevsky or Dic

  5. says:

    This is one of those books that can be life changing I read this as a teenager and I remember exactly where I was sitting on my bed in my grandmother's house in southern Germany when I finished it I must have spent an hour just staring out the window in awe of the lives I'd just led the experiences I'd just hadI'm now re reading t

  6. says:

    So I did it I finally convinced myself to read War and Peace partly because it's just something everyone wants to say they've done and partly because one always needs a good excuse to procrastinate during the exam period whe

  7. says:

    857 War and Peace Leo TolstoyWar and Peace is a novel by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy which is regarded as a central work of world literature and one of Tolstoy's finest literary achievementsTolstoy said War and Peace is not a novel even less is it a poem and still less a historical chronicle Large sections especially the later chapters are philosophical discussion rather than narrative Tolstoy also said th

  8. says:

    857 ВОИНА И МИР War and Peace Leo TolstoyWar and Peace is a novel by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy which is regarded as a central work of world literature and one of Tolstoy's finest literary achievementsThe novel begins in July 1805 in Saint Petersburg at a soirée given by Anna Pavlovna Scherer—t

  9. says:

    In this frightening isolated time let me direct you to War and Peace People resist this book they do it because it's something of a punch line

  10. says:

    Holy cow I am done Not sure what to say I feel like I should write a 1000 page review but I will keep it short I finished the book while a passenger in a mini van stuck in horrible Atlanta trafficThe book was not uite as readable as some other

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