Free How Fiction Works PDF By James Wood

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Nto the machinery of storytelling to ask some fundamental uestions What do we mean when we say we know a fictional character What constitutes a telling detail When is a metaphor successful Is Realism realistic Why do some literary conventions become dated while others stay freshJames Wood ranges widely f. This is a book I ve read re read and re re read I go back to it freuently whenever I ve finished one of the titles from its bibliography or just to revisit Wood s various topics Deceptively simple and uickly read If allowed HFW will inform any novel you read It is not comprehensive in its scope it omits topics like plot structure etc and limits itself to Wood s own intersts an issue some reviewers take exception to There was a time when I d read a passage from a novel and wonder whose word IS that Thanks to Wood I realize many of those passages were written in free indirect style Now that I can identify it I see its use freuently and have an appreciation for its utility Whatever else this book is it is NOT a how to manual for new authors Although they would likely benefit from reading it Wood s simple presentation considers an abundance of novels many uite well known or classics and he adds insight

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How Fiction Works

In the tradition of E M Forster's Aspects of the Novel and Milan Kundera's The Art of the Novel How Fiction Works is a scintillating study of the magic of fiction an analysis of its main elements and a celebration of its lasting power Here one of the most prominent and stylish critics of our time looks i. When I talk about free indirect style I am really talking about point of view and when I talk about point of view I am really talking about the perception of detail and when I talk about detail I m really talking about character and when I talk about character I am really talking about the real which is at the bottom of my inuiries James Wood How Fiction WorksYou might not agree with everything James Wood has to say about a particular author or work of literature but you have to admit there isn t another booklover passionately dedicated to careful reading finely honed criticism and upholding high standards How Fiction Works is case in point very much like an expert mechanic examining the assorted parts of the engine in an Italian or German sports car James Wood rolls up his sleeves and scrutinizes various aspects of what goes into the writing of fiction especially the novel His particular met

James Wood ¶ 0 Summary

Rom Homer to Make Way for Ducklings from the Bible to John le Carré and his book is both a study of the techniues of fiction making and an alternative history of the novel Playful and profound How Fiction Works will be enlightening to writers readers and anyone else interested in what happens on the pag. I thought this book would be written with a writerly slant but no More with a readerly slant turns out Still as a writer wading into novel writing you can pick up a thing or two Up to you I imagine Wood thinking He s about educating readersThe good thing This is mostly approached in layman s terms It does not come across as high falutin ivory tower show off talk that is when authors have an audience of fellow professors in mind The other good thing Wood uses so many excerpts by way of example you will find yourself wanting to read some of the books he alludes to For me that would be books like The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis Saramago Sabbath s Theater Roth Seize the Day Bellow The Waves Woolf The Rainbow Lawrence and Wittgenstein s Nephew Bernhard to name a fewIt s always embarrassing to see how not so well read you are when you read books about reading isn t itAnyway the sections of the book


10 thoughts on “How Fiction Works

  1. says:

    “When I talk about free indirect style I am really talking about point of view and when I talk about point of view I am really talking about the perception of detail and when I talk about detail I'm really talking about character

  2. says:

    Critics often get a bad reputation and likely deservingly so I often reflect on a uote by Macedonio Fernández that a critic knows nothing of what perfect literature is but only what it is not and especially while writing on Goodreads am constantly haunted by Susan Sontag's Against Interpretation I tend to think of critics as being that fr

  3. says:

    For 75 pages this was all clang clang clang goes the trolley ding ding ding goes the bell but then it turned a sharp corner and I think I done got throwed off the bus Ow As it rattled off without me I was left to think carefully about what I’m doing when I read a novel aside from avoiding the interminable election debates on tv OMG another 3 weeks to go and what I think a novel is doing or supposed to be doing It’s

  4. says:

    What I love about books like this is that they are filled with gobbets I rewatched The History Boys also referenc

  5. says:

    This is a book I've read re read and re re read I go back to it freuently whenever I've finished one of the titles from its bibliogr

  6. says:

    I kind of hate reading books of this sort as they leave me with a heightened awareness of style character rhyth

  7. says:

    A verymost entertaining and informative book about books and how writers make them from words placed in different orders Split into handy cha

  8. says:

    021116 this is gently deceptive as a title this is not how 'fiction' works but how a 'sort' of fiction works which happens to be his 'sort' and

  9. says:

    I thought this book would be written with a writerly slant but no More with a readerly slant turns out Still as a writer w

  10. says:

    Between the years 1910 and 1915 R A Torrey and A C Dixon compiled a series of books of essays entitled The Fundamentals With this series Torrey and Dixon set out to give the true Christian absolutely everything that she needed to know in order to have as complete a picture of the Creation as possible Perhaps i